Message From Father Langan, November 26-27

November 26-27

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

     Already we are bombarded with urgent reminders to get ready for Christmas.  But as we begin the holy season of Advent we do so with a very different perspective.  Over the next four weeks (and it’s a full four weeks this Advent), we recall how The Son of God came and still comes to us.  Our Lord Jesus Christ first came to us as an infant lying in a food trough for animals.  On a future day He will come “like a thief in the night”, as our judge at the end of time.  But today and every day He comes to us as Emmanuel, “God with us”, in the Sacramental life of His Mystical Body, the Church.

The Sacraments, through Word and Action, put us in the very Presence of God Who in turn becomes present in us.  Most especially in the Holy Eucharist do we recognize His Real Presence in our midst.  Whenever we sing the beautiful hymn, “O Come, O Come Emmanuel “we become very much aware of His Presence in our midst.  How then should we in turn welcome the Lord?  Certainly, with the greatest reverence and adoration but also with a clean heart and conscience we say Come Lord Jesus.  Ever merciful, beyond our comprehension, He provides the very means for us to be cleansed before entering into His Presence, namely the Sacrament of Reconciliation/Confession.

We fret so much about providing the “perfect” gift for those who are dear to us.  What about the perfect gift for Him whose birthday we are celebrating?  Since Advent reminds us to be in a state of preparation, for we know not the hour or the day, let us resolve at the very beginning of this holy season to make the best preparation, a good and thorough Confession.

With Blessings for a Fruitful Advent,

Father Langan

Chapel Attendance

We are currently in the process of updating our chapel records and are asking the attendees to contact the Parish Office to verify the day of the week and time of attendance. Thank you for your cooperation.

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Message from Father Langan, November 12-13

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

We are drawing to the end of the liturgical year which will culminate next Sunday as we celebrate Christ the King of the Universe (Nov. 20th). The Scriptures of today are eschatological in nature, that is, they remind us that this world is passing and thus we need to live in a state of preparedness. Our Lord does not want us to be fearful but rather expectant and hopeful as we await the Parousia-His Second Coming. The preparedness is our being in the state of grace by following the Ten Commandments and Eight Beatitudes, loving God and our neighbor. When we are faithful to the Lord, there is nothing to fear.

Since we know not the hour nor the day of His return we heed St. Paul’s encouragement to be about our daily tasks, not in idleness or grumbling but rather in sincere devotion and attention to our labours. After all, we have now been waiting for two thousand years and sometimes we can become sluggish in our anticipation of the Lord’s return. When we consider the Sacred Scriptures as a whole, we come to understand that God operates in millennia: Abraham 1850 BC; Moses 1500 BC: Israel’s exile in Egypt 430 years: King David 1000 BC; Our Lord’s First Coming 2 millennia ago. So why should our time frame be any different? In due time God’s purpose will be accomplished. In the meantime, we wait with patient endurance, cheerful hopefulness and gratitude for the mercy God extended to us most especially in the Sacrament of Reconciliation, which restores us to the state of grace.

With Blessings,
Father Langan

Message from Father Langan, November 5-6

November 5-6

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

    We are quickly coming to the end of the liturgical year of grace 2022 and the last Sunday of November will begin the new liturgical year with the First Sunday of Advent.  The month began with our celebration of the great cloud of witnesses, namely the saints, who from the realms of glory watch over us and assist us in our earthly journey to the Kingdom.  Not only are we "connected" to the heavenly Church but also to those souls being purged from the dross of repentant sins.  They need our help just as we need the help of the saints in glory.  The Church suffering and being purified in Purgatory depends on our prayers and sacrifices, most especially the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, to prepare them for entrance into Heaven.  How wondrous is the mercy of God in willing this mutual cooperation.  Yes, we are our brothers and sisters keepers.

Some of the present generation have forgotten the mutuality of assisting each other, both the living and those beyond the pale of this life. An important question we might ask ourselves is: "Who is going to pray for me when I pass to the other side?"  "Will the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass be offered for me?”  "Will I have the purifying graces of a funeral Mass offered for the repose of my soul?"  How terribly sad it would be to languish in Purgatory because no one is praying for me.  

 November puts starkly in mind that this world is passing and the four last things: Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell, are something we must deal with.   The present culture  is going to push us to speed up, but the natural world, that God has given us, reminds us to slow down.  God's lessons are all around us.  Let us take heed.

 This week your pastor, along with 7 parishioners and 24 other pilgrims will be travelling to the Holy Land to walk in the footsteps of Our Savior, His beloved Mother and disciples.  During this 10-day pilgrimage we ask your prayers for safe travel.  You most certainly will be remembered in our Masses and prayers as we visit those sights recalled in the Sacred Scriptures.   In my absence our dear Fr. Balaraju Desam will be covering and serving your spiritual needs I know you will be delighted to welcome him back as he is happy to visit all his friends in Wayne County.

With Blessings,
Father Langan

Message from Father Langan, October 30-31:

October 30-31

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

Last Sunday and again today, a tax collector has been the protagonist in each Gospel pericope.  One might wonder why Our Lord and St. Luke, the Evangelist of this Gospel, single out the men of this profession.  Luke himself was an “outsider”.  Surely, he was a confidant of St. Paul, and he received his information about our Lord’s Nativity from none other than the Blessed Mother Herself, but he may very well have felt an affinity with those who were scorned by their own.  Outcasts always look for someone to identify themselves with less they feel alone.

No matter how singular one may feel, we are never alone.  We hear in the Book of Wisdom how:  “God loathes nothing that He has made.”  If then He has made it He must love it in spite of not being loved in return.  If God ceased to love what He has made, it would no longer exist.  So, here we are.  We must have been made for a purpose and the joy of life is discovering what that purpose may be.  God participates in our self-discovery by infusing us with the grace we need as we go step by step.

Something that has stayed with me since my high school graduation from West Scranton High School was the song we learned and sang at our commencement:  “You’ll Never Walk Alone”.  Frequently, I sing it to myself, not out of nostalgia, but as a reassurance that no matter what comes, the Lord is beside me.  This was especially true when I was assigned to the Arctic Circle in the winter of 1984.  As a chaplain I was required to move around to different outposts to serve the Marines where they were.  On one occasion I was dropped off by one unit and had to wait for another unit to pick me up.  For a short time, I was standing and waiting by myself on this god-forsaken expanse of nothing but snow, so what do you think I started to sing?  My old high school graduation song and since I was “alone”, at the top of my lungs!  The approaching marines must have thought I went snow-mad.  But I was just assuring myself that I was not alone.

Our tax collector friends knew that they were not alone in the Presence of the Living God.  Zacchaeus especially found himself filled with the Presence of Christ, not only when Our Lord came to his home, but thereafter for the rest of his life.  May you also know the Presence of Him as you continue to discover the purpose of your life.  In the meantime, sing at the top of your lungs.

With Blessings,

Father Langan

Message from Father Langan, October 22-23

October 22-23

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

    These past two weeks have emphasized the necessity of constant prayer in our lives.  We do not come to the Lord only when we need something but rather we keep open and regular conversation with Him from the moment of our awakening until we close our eyes in sleep.  Throughout the course of the day there are innumerable moments when we really need to turn to the Lord with simple requests:  ” Please advise me Lord; Lord give me strength in knowing how to treat this particular person in charity;  Lord is it Your will or mine at stake here?: Lord have mercy; Lord, slow me down.”  These are just a few of the ways we allow God to direct our lives in His peace.  It surely does not mean we will not have challenges.  They are a part of life.  But we never have to face those challenges alone. 

    St. Paul, in today’s lesson, while waiting to be executed for Christ, catches himself.  First he is feeling abandoned by his colleagues and then he comes to realize Christ is there beside him in his agony.  Perhaps too often we are looking for solace from human beings when in prayer we need to re-orient ourselves to the abiding presence of the Lord.  That is the beginning of humility which we see so well expressed in the publican’s prayer in the temple.  The Pharisee is saying:” You owe me, God”.  The publican is saying: “I owe You.”   Is that not what our life should be? an I owe you to God.  When we consider the blessings, the gifts, the mercy that has been showered on us, how can we not in prayerful gratitude return adoration, respect, obedience and above all love to God.  This is the mark of humility.  This is the prayer that “pierces the heavens”.

With Blessings,

Father Langan